The daily commute

After a long night of tinkering, I finally perfected the Auto-Controlled-Traffic/Ant-Commuter-Train (ACT/ACT) car. My family, cynics all, laughed when I first told them of my concept.

I sat cross-legged on the floor of my garage, staring at my car. It looked the same as before; the difference was what now lived within. What I’d created. As of this morning, my car had the heart, mind and soul of an ant – a creature that could mindlessly join a line of other ACT/ACT cars, carrying on the business of being a car without care or strife.

I leaned back on one hand, raking my free hand through my greasy, lanky hair. I couldn’t remember when I’d last bathed; it had been months since my last haircut. Long months spent working alone. Months when even I occasionally doubted. Today, those doubts were gone and my vision was that much closer: not just one, but a streaming flow of ACT/ACT cars. No more wrecks. No more traffic jams. No more road-rage.

Now, I wondered, how could I replicate my invention, getting it into the cars up and down my block, and the next block, throughout my neighborhood, even the whole city? Why not think on a grand scale? Why not target the entire state of Texas? Traffic on I-35 would be much-improved if all commuters cooperated in the way of ants, made possible with ACT/ACT cars.

I fell asleep on the floor of my garage, dreaming of that day.

*image from myfolio

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For the IndieInk Writing Challenge this week, Kat challenged me with “If you could invent something to help mankind what would it be?” and I challenged Kurt with “It’s not easy being green.”

About Fran Hart

Disciple of Christ, earning a living as the director of US-based operations for a Taiwanese company, managing an engineering organization while carving out time to write. Wife, Mother, Grandmother.
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2 Responses to The daily commute

  1. I love the combination of ‘mad scientist’ and humor here! Without even testing it, the protagonist is ready to infiltrate the block, no the city, no the state! Next the country and then the world, the world. (Right after a nap.)

  2. Tara R. says:

    How cool would this be if it could work though?